Posts Tagged ‘Paris’

Bercy/Bibliothèque Nationale

Monday, June 12th, 2017

Off to explore a quartier which has greatly changed since we lived in Paris. The formerly industrial neighborhood is now home to a cultural-educational-flower-filled park edged with spiffy apartment towers, and the 19th century stone wine warehouses now accommodate shops and restaurants. It’s an easy walk across the Seine to the four controversial towering volumes of the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, today packed with students cramming for the Bac.

It’s a Paris Party

Sunday, June 11th, 2017

Sunday afternoon in Paris: a time to get together for an eleven-hour lunch with old friends.

 

À la Recherche de l’Oeuf Perdu (de Paul Arzens)

Friday, June 9th, 2017

It is not an actual egg we seek, but the electric car built by Paul Arzens during WWII that he showed us when we were living in Paris in the late 70s.

The Courtyard, and Beyond

Friday, June 9th, 2017

Ideal day: begin with this view at breakfast, then wander the streets.

Paris, Pigeon, Poutres apparentes

Thursday, June 8th, 2017

The best of all places to begin a Paris sojourn: on a bench in the Jardin du Luxembourg. (But maybe without suitcases.)

Citroën…Then and Now

Wednesday, July 17th, 2013

Fr13-7.17Citroen

We’ll always have Paris

Monday, May 7th, 2012

My husband, a fellow artist, has recently launched a blog to show a selection of his art—photographs, drawings, paintings, and sculpture—and he is now permitting me to share the news. I encourage you to check out his beautiful and varied work. This is an image from today’s post.

ParisDiamonds

CakeBalloons2Karla

A Glimpse of Tolerance

Friday, April 13th, 2012

ParisMassChair

Today is the anniversary of  the enactment of the Edict of Nantes, a modest 16th-century attempt at freedom of worship. For a sketch and a mini-history, please see One Small Step for l’Homme.

Advent 2: Day in Autumn

Sunday, December 4th, 2011

The second Sunday of Advent falls on the birthday of Rainer Maria Rilke (1875-1926), and in celebration I post this seasonal poem in the original German, along with one of its numerous translations, and a painting. If you have a translation you prefer then please tell me about it.

For another Rilke poem, and a sketch, please see Holding up all this falling.

Acorn

Herbsttag

Herr: es ist Zeit. Der Sommer war sehr groß.
Leg deinen Schatten auf die Sonnenuhren,
und auf den Fluren laß die Winde los.
Befiel den letzten Früchten voll zu sein;
gib ihnen noch zwei südlichere Tage,
dränge sie zur Vollendung hin und jage
die letzte Süße in den schweren Wein.
Wer jetzt kein Haus hat, baut sich keines mehr.
Wer jetzt allein ist, wird Es lange bleiben,
wird wachen, lesen, lange Briefe schreiben
und wird in den Alleen hin und her
unruhig wandern, wenn die Blätter treiben.

—Rainer Maria Rilke (1902)

Day in Autumn

Lord: it is time. Great was the Summer’s feast.
Now lay upon the sun-dials your shadow
And on the meadows have the wind released.
Command the last of fruits to round their shapes;
Grant two more days of south for vines to carry,
To their perfection thrust them on, and harry
The final sweetness into the heavy grapes.
Who has not built his house will not start now
Who now is by himself will long be so,
Be wakeful, read, write lengthy letters, go
In vague disquiet pacing up and down
Denuded lanes, with leaves adrift below.

—Trans. Walter Arndt (1989)

Bastille Day

Thursday, July 14th, 2011

Radishes

In honor of the day I post this painting, featuring, among other things, our ratty yet beloved old Paris guide to arrondissements. This morning we hung from the porch our homemade French flag and put Edith Piaf on the CD player. For dinner I will make a soufflé (not exactly a dish suited to July, but definitely a family favorite) and we’ll watch “Casablanca” and sing along during the Marseillaise scene. Vive la France!

This image is available as a high-resolution print on 8.5″ x 11″ archival paper.